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How do you get good at Linux?


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#1 Belikewater

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 07:55 PM

Whats up Bodi fam,

 

I have been enjoying Linux and in particular been obsessed with Bodhi Linux. I am starting a job in two months as a level 3 tech with a company that uses Unix. This prompted me to get into Linux and I dumped Windows. Anyways, I have been learning through books and tutorials on terminal commands and small admin skills. What I notice on many of you here are way beyond my skill knowledge, which I admire. So I am interested to know how you all gained skills with Linux and learning the system.

 

 


Always be yourself, express yourself, have faith in yourself, do not go out and look for a successful personality and duplicate it [Bruce Lee]




A big thank you to everyone who contributes to Bodhi Linux


#2 Elw3

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 08:01 PM

For me its a mystery....

One day it made plop and now i get everything. 

My first posts in this forum are actually very noobish. 


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#3 ylee

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 08:30 PM

I suppose we all have had a different path to whatever it is we know about the nixes. For me I began with ubuntu back in the day of dapper drake. I started working on the ubuntu forums and reading lots of stuff. I worked my way thru the Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide. Yep the whole book, looked at the man pages and or googled any command I was unfamiliar with and kept notes and sample code. I ran lots of different distros in Virtual box and experimented with customizing DE's, answering forum questions and actually breaking stuff in VB. Spent way to much time hanging out in IRC channels. I looked and still look thru source code and config files to figure out how things work. I did the Linux from scratch thing and beyond.  Took my time on it and made sure I understood everything I was doing and compared how LFS differs from Ubuntu/Debian based distros. Compiled the enlightenment foundation libraries and e19 on LFS. During all this of course I played with whatever programming languages interested me and developed a love of python.

 

And I know just enough to know how little I know ...


"No technology can ever be too arcane or complicated for the black t-shirt crowd."


#4 The waiter

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 08:42 PM

Following forum posts was a good start for me. Still considering myself as a Linux novice but after some time I was able to persuade my family and friends to give Linux a try. Of course it was me who installed it on their machines. And then it fully blossomed. I needed to solve many and many new problems with printers, TV card, GPUs etc. Each PC = new challenge.  

 

And then I wanted to do more, so I asked Jeff if I can help with SW packaging which I had no idea how it works. So as Ylee posted, studying and studying... :)



#5 ylee

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 08:46 PM

Yeah I forgot all about that but naturally I installed a gnu/linux distro on each pc i had or got as well as other peoples and sometimes struggled to get stuff to work or figure out how to get hardware such as printers webcams et al to work.


"No technology can ever be too arcane or complicated for the black t-shirt crowd."


#6 graywizardlinux

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 10:23 PM

for me it is crawling and crawling.... :lol:  I still know squat....



#7 Randy

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Posted 02 May 2016 - 12:35 AM

Just replace "having a life" with Linux!  ;)    And make google your new best friend! :rolleyes:


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#8 BeGo

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Posted 02 May 2016 - 03:43 AM

The honest answer is probably, you dont.  :)

 

The more you learn Linux, the more you realize that so many thing you dont know about Linux yet.  :P



#9 aka jazz

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Posted 03 May 2016 - 12:06 AM

I had the advantage or disadvantage of a programming background, so I knew two things are needed book, a dead tree typne, with a linux coverdisc, by Andersen. It presented linux in an organized manner, so one could understand the stuff that mattered: the heirarchical file system, security and permissions, when, where, why, and so on. With an ever growing collection of printed google hits, it was easy to miss the forest for the trees. Whenever I was challenged, the book was my first resort; the book is dog-eared now, but still intact. The CD is still in that sleeve, in case some alien decides to try an OS and he happened to have an optical drive in his shuttle.

 

And I tried something that wasn't covered in the book. Not enlightenment; e16 was already close to 'going gold'. The second thing I got was a used monitor. Hooked up to a first-gen nvidia, I made sure it could match everything that Windows could do. With e17, it far exceeded my expectations. I try to connect a second screen whenever possible. This was before *buntu, and thinkpads had 'IBM' not lenovo, and they were thick enough to stop a bullet.

 

Mr BeGo is right. Think of it this way, you decide that 'good in linux' meant 'able to boot from a USB stick that

 you made yourself'. Well you already know that, so you change good in linux to be equivalent to 'no gui desktop'. Then later you realize the goalposts keep moving or shifting.

 

Sometime later you realize that good in linux really meant 'good enough to get hired to administer a hospital network'. For now, you can join the legions that can say I'm familiar with it. Later on in life, you will take that 'good in linux' out of its protective case and use it. Or use it tonight, against your smart alecky younger sister, to proclaim I'm good in linux and you're not. nya nya nya :)


Screenshots of e17 at the Gallerie des shedied and here for just one only. Incidentally,why don't you try our friendly IRC channel for some help? (link up top) or watch an e-ducational clip that's 2 and a half minutes long

#10 Jeff

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Posted 03 May 2016 - 01:59 PM

Take your working system, "fix it" until it is broken, make it work again, and then repeat.

 

Lurking various message boards and helping to try and solve other people's issues via Google searches is also a good growing experience.



#11 Belikewater

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 03:25 PM

Great tips!

 

I am working through Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide

It is already way over my head, so I will be making lots of google searches.

 

Akajazz I did not understand what book you got. Maybe im reading the post wrong, but I tried searching and couldn't find it.

 

Jeff I will also try to look through forum posts and see if I can solve the issues through searches. This is good troubleshooting training.

 

:D


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Always be yourself, express yourself, have faith in yourself, do not go out and look for a successful personality and duplicate it [Bruce Lee]


#12 ylee

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 03:45 PM

If ya want books I can give ya links or names of alot. Really it depends upon what ya want  to learn. "get good at linux" is sorta vague. A system administrator has a different skill set than a linux kernel programmer. And both most likely live in a different world than the one a gtk code monkey lives in developing cross platform gtk apps.
 
But anyways better keep it simple and only go thru one or two at a time. For best results approach it like a college class and actually study the stuff do the examples and try your best to understand.
 
As to jazz's book recommendation maybe Just Enough Linux: Paul K. Andersen
 


"No technology can ever be too arcane or complicated for the black t-shirt crowd."


#13 aka jazz

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 09:43 PM

@belikewater

 

The book might be available now at a used or secondhand bookstore; there are newer distros around; so it certainly would not hurt to pick up one that has you mastering archlinux, or slackware; there is a website that lets you stick with archlinux but the CD rotates window managers so that you can find one that suits YOUR workflow. Their record used to be 30 window managers in 30 days; check out their website to see the current record. I wish I could give you the title of my book but there are plenty of them out now. It's a chicken-and-egg scenario: pick a distro, buy a book. So getting a book with a coverdisc can only be a WIN-WIN :)After that, your searches will become more focused, and your collection of notes can then be grouped together, instead of staying as random notes, post-its stuck in a confused pattern around your screen (and keyboard).


Screenshots of e17 at the Gallerie des shedied and here for just one only. Incidentally,why don't you try our friendly IRC channel for some help? (link up top) or watch an e-ducational clip that's 2 and a half minutes long

#14 Vijay Hiremath

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Posted 05 May 2016 - 04:04 PM

I started my career as firmware developer, which basically revolves around Embeddded C.

Soon after i was smitten by Linux. My first Laptop came with Ubuntu 12.04 by default.

I started enjoying linux for its speed, i changed to many different distros, got bored of customizing each distro.

Then started looking under hood what really happens at Low level, at the same i got the job opportunity 

of writing application for linux file systems.

 

This is how i started with Linux.



#15 sef

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Posted 08 May 2016 - 10:24 AM

I started by installing many different distros. Couldn't really ever settle on one until I found bodhi. (Bodhi means something to the effect of "awakening" in case some don't know.)

I felt like I had a pretty good understanding of Linux but wanted to know more, so I read through the COMPTIA Linux+ study guide (2013 version). That was very awakening for me. I never took the test but the book read to me as a novel would, so interesting i couldn't put it down. If you're going to get that or any other linux book, be sure to get the most recent since technology is very fluid and changing constantly. My $0.02.

<-sef>

Nothing is as simple as it seems at first,
or as hopeless as it seems in the middle,
or as finished as it seems in the end.


#16 paradox103

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Posted 09 May 2016 - 11:55 AM

Of course, it depends on what you mean by "good at Linux". There's a different standard for being a competent user, vs administering your family computer, vs contributing code to the kernel. 

For me, the thing that has helped the most is actually using it. When I see something I don't like or have broken, I go research how to change or fix it. Also, I like to come on the forums and just read any topic that seems interesting. Sometimes someone is asking for help on a problem, and someone else has a creative solution that's worth remembering.


Deny all, permit by exception: for some it is not just a config setting, but a state of mind.


#17 aka jazz

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Posted 10 May 2016 - 02:25 AM

I have to add that I logged into various channels in IRC, like #ubuntu, #fedora, and #mandrake (now manjaro). Those channels were hyperactive (and still are, I believe). I lurked and paid attention; the first place their audience went for support was IRC, next was forums. Bodhi has it the other way around, and it works. Plus we have a beginner's guide. I saw how problems were solved or nudged in the right direction, and how online etiquette was enforced or encouraged. When it was a relatively simple problem (or one that I've encountered before) I did what I could to help lighten the load. It was a good learning experience.


Screenshots of e17 at the Gallerie des shedied and here for just one only. Incidentally,why don't you try our friendly IRC channel for some help? (link up top) or watch an e-ducational clip that's 2 and a half minutes long

#18 Kev

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Posted 13 May 2016 - 11:13 AM

Try other distro's .... Arch Linux, Slackware,etc.... these types require you read and experiment.  However it a lot depends on how deep a knowledge you want to gain.  There is also Linux from scratch (LFS) would be a fun hobby....


- Kevin

#19 aka jazz

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Posted 21 May 2016 - 02:50 PM

One last thing, once you feel that you know a lot about this OS, and X and xorg, attach another display. Everything old will seem new again, and you will realize that you still have much ground to cover, because you have learned everything on one display; now the question is, how about two? How do I show the other half of the movie on *that* display?


Screenshots of e17 at the Gallerie des shedied and here for just one only. Incidentally,why don't you try our friendly IRC channel for some help? (link up top) or watch an e-ducational clip that's 2 and a half minutes long

#20 Belikewater

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Posted 01 June 2016 - 02:35 PM

Thanks everyone. I am trying Slackware currently. I already miss Bodhi. Bodhi is still my favorite Distro. Slackware is a whole new level. I feel like an idiot trying to use it. And the help isn't always given without people battering me about my newbieness.  I have still not gotten a hang for the basics,but as soon as I hopefully get an understanding of it ill be back with Bodhi. 


Always be yourself, express yourself, have faith in yourself, do not go out and look for a successful personality and duplicate it [Bruce Lee]





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