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Best Answer ContemplativeFarmer, 14 October 2016 - 03:14 PM

The first reply from Skater actually got me where I want to go.  I had not thought to simply use a key-binding.  ( I don't think that was what I had been doing originally, but it get me where I want to go).  Thanks much to Staind and Elw3 for helping me remember what was as compared to what is!

 

Now, to nitpick the differences:  I think that the original setup I had made use of the Xorg.conf file, making a 'virtual screen' which was as wide as both my monitors, thus the monitor/desktop relationship was 1:1.  (I think).  That was back when I worked on a desktop and my monitor config rarely if ever changed.  Now that I work exclusively on laptops and move from place to place, with monitor setups never the same, it is not really a feasible approach.

 

The constantly changing environment eventually led me to confusion regarding what gets set where, how, and when, with RandR, Xorg.conf, and video cards/drivers(a couple of different laptops) exacerbating my already clogged old memory :-) .  

 

The keybind solution works really well for me because I rarely use the desktop gadget in the tray to do more than remind what desktop I am on when I return from a break, I simply cycle to the desktop I want using the Ctrl+Alt+(left/right).  

 

When I move from place to place (main home, farm workshop, other semi-static-place-where-monitor-setup-rarely-changes), I simply use RandR to select the appropriate config after login, and I am on my way.  No muss, no fuss.

 

The beauty of enlightenment, (much like Perl) There is more than one way to do it (TIMTOWTDI).  Which is another of the reasons I have been stuck on it for so many years...

Thanks again to all!   

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9 replies to this topic

#1 ContemplativeFarmer

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Posted 01 October 2016 - 05:33 PM

One thing that seems to have changed over the last few versions of Enlightenment is the relationship between a monitor and a 'screen'.  I used be able to have a virtual desktop that spanned both of my monitors, which I still do in a way.  My desktop spans both monitors with the mouse moving between with no problem.  However, when I switch desktops, only the desktop on the monitor which is currently in use switches, the other monitor remains.  I of course can then move to the other monitor and  switch that one as well.  

 

What I want to do is group the display across monitors as a single desktop, so that when I switch, I get both.  This used to be the default in my experience.  Have I missed some fundamental change that happened?  More importantly, is there a way to achieve what I have (hopefully described in an understandable way) asked about?  I want the virtual desktop to the width of both monitors, but am not seeing how to get there...

 

Thanks in advance,

 

wjw


..life is a strange place...

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#2 staind

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Posted 01 October 2016 - 11:44 PM

I had the same setup, in fact it will always be my setup whenever I get a chance. Desktops that span, with shortcuts or keybinds that spin that massive desktop. And movies on 16:10, with enough space left for an IRC window. In between, I have to put up with one screen. It just isn't the same.

 

The changes are subtle; make sure that you pick the appropriate key bind. Pick the one that says Switch to Desktop Left (All screens), not just switch to desktop left. There are the usual regulars like Switch to desktop nn, but pick Switch to desktop nn(All screens)

 

All of the above is from memory; I have used the desktop for so long that I cannot pick any other desktop. The same shortcut keys always programmed to do the same job. Feel free to ask more questions; trust me, they are no problem at all.

 

But you have to remember that the spanned desktop is configured even before you get to enlightenment, with tools such as nvidia's own configuration, heck even a good old fashioned xorg.conf if you know your way around it. xrandr comes in as a testing tool. Time to watch those screens with both eyes.


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#3 Elw3

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 04:23 PM

 

 

What I want to do is group the display across monitors as a single desktop, so that when I switch, I get both.  This used to be the default in my experience.

Its the oppsite, THIS IS the bug, the default setting gives each screen its own workspace. 

You get the whole span thing when you graphic card is not correctly activated. For me that means to unload the nvidia drivers. 


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#4 staind

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Posted 06 October 2016 - 04:11 PM

my 2 cents. Do it differently, even the slightest bit, and you will get the bug that Elw3 knows about. I do not have a hybrid card; it was more of the kind you now find in the clearance corner for about US$5, give or take.

 

You will load the nvidia installer. It will list the chips supported by the driver.

 

The configuration tool gives a gui to set up multihead. The nvidia tool is all that matters. You can set up panning with it. You will end up with an xorg.conf. If you have done your homework, you should know what it is for. If you know only Ubuntu and/or recent distros, you can live with the automatically detected and self-configured xorg.conf. It will work--for the main display. While the other attached display will mimic the first, or stay blank. And you then tell the others, multihead doesn't work.

 

So you take the new xorg.conf, and place it in its proper location, in /etc. But you have to enter additional features. The important thing with this xorg.conf is that it knows you have two displays. This is your new starting point, or it is the end-of-the-line for the faint of heart. You can start using xrandr on the command line now to try out different configurations.

 

With the right approach, or by accident, you will end up with the displays you need--a desktop that spans, instead of twin workspaces. Good luck

 

If you figure things out correctly, or configure things the proper way, and a simple xrandr not only lists both displays but even lists each monitor's available resolutions, you should be able to 'pivot' one of them 90 degrees, or even add a third display. If you have gotten this far, and have a screenshot or photo of your rig running all displays, I think it's time to get a t-shirt. Heck, get two. The third t-shirt is for that guy who thinks you only use Windows to set up two displays :) He ought to buy you the water bottle (or a decent lager) since he lost the bet.


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#5 ContemplativeFarmer

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Posted 14 October 2016 - 03:14 PM   Best Answer

The first reply from Skater actually got me where I want to go.  I had not thought to simply use a key-binding.  ( I don't think that was what I had been doing originally, but it get me where I want to go).  Thanks much to Staind and Elw3 for helping me remember what was as compared to what is!

 

Now, to nitpick the differences:  I think that the original setup I had made use of the Xorg.conf file, making a 'virtual screen' which was as wide as both my monitors, thus the monitor/desktop relationship was 1:1.  (I think).  That was back when I worked on a desktop and my monitor config rarely if ever changed.  Now that I work exclusively on laptops and move from place to place, with monitor setups never the same, it is not really a feasible approach.

 

The constantly changing environment eventually led me to confusion regarding what gets set where, how, and when, with RandR, Xorg.conf, and video cards/drivers(a couple of different laptops) exacerbating my already clogged old memory :-) .  

 

The keybind solution works really well for me because I rarely use the desktop gadget in the tray to do more than remind what desktop I am on when I return from a break, I simply cycle to the desktop I want using the Ctrl+Alt+(left/right).  

 

When I move from place to place (main home, farm workshop, other semi-static-place-where-monitor-setup-rarely-changes), I simply use RandR to select the appropriate config after login, and I am on my way.  No muss, no fuss.

 

The beauty of enlightenment, (much like Perl) There is more than one way to do it (TIMTOWTDI).  Which is another of the reasons I have been stuck on it for so many years...

Thanks again to all!   


..life is a strange place...

ContemplativeFarmer

#6 staind

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Posted 15 October 2016 - 05:26 AM

You're welcome sir. :)


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#7 staind

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Posted 15 October 2016 - 02:06 PM

It seems you have been using keybinds after all; at least the most important one that mattered at the time for your scenario. Ctrl+Alt+(left/right) and you admit to rarely using the 'gadget'; you never even gave it a second thought. The xorg.conf was set up to match the 1:1, and that was enough. You had a SPANNED Desk.

 

Now one of your components has changed. A laptop or an upgrade has occurred, and you wish to get the spanned desktop once more. Posting your query in the forum took a minimum of effort, and that effort has been rewarded with "learn something new everyday, TIMTOWTDI.

 

Which brought me another benefit: I set up dual head, spanned, on my recent upgrade as well. And with the Thinkwiki examples on using xrandr, I was able to re-create my setup that I did on an old classic Quake machine. Screenshots to follow, but be warned that they have to be scaled down from 3201x800. Using command-line-fu the cloned desktop became a Wide Desktop; later on we shall see if familiar keybinds can make it behave with ecomorph.


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#8 staind

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Posted 17 October 2016 - 06:09 AM

I wouldn't describe it as a semi static place. But have a look at this post


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#9 staind

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Posted 17 October 2016 - 06:12 AM

Care to figure out how that screenie was put together, Mr Farmer, as a mental exercise  :D


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#10 staind

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Posted 22 October 2016 - 06:20 AM

Games can stay on one screen, thankgod, but work can be spread on two (Submitted today to deviantart, believe it or not)original-7714f1a5c8c71c66a1bfe160321e140


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