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Bodhi 4.0 beta3 comments


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#1 Charles@Bodhi

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Posted 26 October 2016 - 09:40 AM

I had a mishap during installation (not Bodhi that caused it, bad block on my HDD) and while debugging I stumbled on a file that probably should not be there:

/boot/vmlinuz-4.4.0-31-generic.efi.signed

I think you should wipe that from your building machine, it weighs 7MB you don't need as the working kernel is 4.4.0-36 at the moment.

 

Still checking if I can find more, let you know. First have to find out how I can regenerate a Windows entry in my ESP without wiping existing stuff.

 

Enjoy,

Charles





A big thank you to everyone who contributes to Bodhi Linux


#2 gohlip

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Posted 26 October 2016 - 12:43 PM

Thanks for alert but don't have this 'vmlinuz-4.4.0-31-generic.efi.signed' in my uefi Bodhi.

First have to find out how I can regenerate a Windows entry in my ESP without wiping existing stuff.

 

If you find out how, please share with us. Seems like we have to restore windows boot and then restore linux boot.

ps: I  tried to copy over "bootmgfw.efi" and then boot it. Doesn't work.


Life is a sexually transmitted disease with a 100% mortality rate.


#3 Charles@Bodhi

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Posted 26 October 2016 - 09:16 PM

@ gohlip

I used the liveCD to wipe out my ESP as the bad block was in there. Next I created a new fat 32partition using Gparted (100MB). I flagged that as boot and esp. I installed Bodhi using something else to assign my prefered partition and assigned my new ESP as such. Installation went fast including grub-efi to the new EFI partition. It saw my other linux installs but they refuse to boot because my ESP has a new uuid, not corresponding with their fstab entries. Need to fix that using chroot.

But it also did not see Windows as I had no more windows boot files.

Must say, restoring that was a piece of cake once I found the right instructions:

LINK 1.

LINK 2.

The first link has some extra blabbering, explaining what commands are doing and the second link is almost only commands.

Both have the same caveat: In the last command (bcdboot) they use c:\Windows (Capital W) where that should be c:\windows (small w), at least in Win10 on my machine.

 

Writing this from my Windows 10 install, first time booting was extra slow but that should improve I hope.

 

Enjoy,

Charles.


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#4 gohlip

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 03:09 AM

Thanks for the detailed methods outlined in restoring windows boot.

If the $esp is common or shared, does it mean we have to restore our linux bootloader after that?

I was wondering if this (restoring linux after that) will be necessary if there is are separate $esp's for windows and linux.

 

 

Regards,


Life is a sexually transmitted disease with a 100% mortality rate.


#5 Charles@Bodhi

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 09:48 AM

In my case I created the new ESP in linux and had the ubuntu bootloader for Bodhi in it. When Windows restored its boot files the ubuntu folder was not wiped out and I had full access to all my linux installs. So Windows was only adding its stuff to "my" ESP.

Listing the content of /boot/efi/EFI now shows Boot, Microsoft, ubuntu.

 

I have no experience with multiple ESPs myself, but all documents I've read suggest to have only one ESP per disk.

 

Enjoy,

Charles

 

PS: we are getting way off topic. If you want to know more PM me.



#6 gohlip

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 11:46 AM

Ok, thanks for the feedback.

I myself has 4 $esp's. One for windows, one for all linux OS's, one for my own grub dedicated  partition and another for bootctl (systemd boot).

All works fine. But I mainly (now) use my own $esp to boot everything. Left the bootclt in disarray (do not maintain the many kernel changes that needs manual intervention) and install all linux OS to that linux $esp but boot all (including windows) from my grub. So far so good.

 

I ask my question because I've not messed up windows yet, but from what I've read, if the $esp is shared (usually the case for most people), and windows restored its boot, linux boots get wiped out too. Good to hear this is not the case with you.

 

Cheers, take care.

 

ps: I have 2 Bodhi 4's. One in uefi/gpt and another in bios-legacy/msdos. Both working great (Bodhi had always been working great since I used :)  ).

And the one on UEFI, I've changed to yakketty (16.10); I know, at my own risk. Also, I boot up my custom remastered Bodhi isofile more than the installed OS's.


Life is a sexually transmitted disease with a 100% mortality rate.


#7 staind

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 02:34 PM

might be easier to get a clean SSD and install Bodhi on it, after scouring the net or ebay for good prices. Total win all around; and a loss for Windows. At least you can get to work quickly that way, and still have the Windows on a drive that you can put back in the laptop to sell at a profit, even if she *is* your sister. Just tell her it's business, not personal. If it were personal it would have cost triple.She can throw in that hoodie because it's a man's color anyway while you get that upgrade you 've been waiting and we are so way off topic. 


In case you have a hard time choosing a shirt, pick the black one with the words "Bodhi Linux" on it.




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