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Great way to learn Linux...what has helped you the most?

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#1 Oblio

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Posted 06 January 2017 - 05:21 PM

I hope that everyone is having a great start of the year!  I'm excited to be starting 2017 with Bodhi 4.0.0!

 

***

 

As a computer enthusiast, I have found Linux has been one of the most rewarding experiences I have come across outside of learning Cisco's IOS.  Countless times I have set things up on my PC (running Linux), blown it up, searched how to fix the issue, blown something else up messing around, chatted on IRC for a solution, blown something else up, poked around the forums for help....ad infinitum.  Love it.  Wouldn't trade if for anything.  Waiting for a windoz update to fix an issue that they broke was not my thing anymore...

 

I have attempted to use other streamlined distros and have found their communities to not be as helpful or welcoming (how dare you ask a question of a forum for help at a non-expert level...tisk tisk...).  It is through this very "slim" nature of Bodhi that has really aided in my learning of Linux - the basics without bloat!  And while I am certainly no Linux expert, I am light-years past where I was 16 or so years ago as a young person running SUSE Enterprise on a homemade computer with a barely functional dial-up connection...guessing if I could figure out syntax through guess and check... 

 

So enough ranting...what have you found to be most useful to learn Linux?

 

Personally, blowing up Bodhi and fixing it has helped a lot - playing with the command line has also helped me better understand what my system is doing and how.  I also found the edx/Linux Foundation's LFS101 "Intro to Linux" class to be helpful with areas that I didn't have much previous exposure to.  Other than that, trolling the forums/IRC for Bodhi and trying to be helpful has taught me a lot.  Even if questions others pose are not issues I have personally experienced, searching and digging into these new topics has been and is a great learning experience.

 

So what has helped and inspired you?


Xeon E3-1220 v3 3.1GHz Quad, ASRock Rack E3C224, 2x 8GB Kingston KVR16E11/8I DDR3-1600 ECC CL11 Intel Chips (Dual Channel), EVGA GeForce GTX 570, Samsung SM863 120GB OS SSD, 2x WD RED 3TB HDDs (Raid 0), Focusrite Scarlett 2i4, Antec Earthwatts EA-750 80 Plus Platinum 750w PSU - Bodhi 4.1.0 64

AMD Phenom II X4 940 3.0GHz Quad, Gigabyte GA-MA78GPM-DS2H, 2x 2GB Kingston KHX8500D2K2 DDR2-1066 (Dual Channel), EVGA GeForce GTX 570, Intel 30GB OS SDD, Seagate ST31000340AS 1TB HDD, Seagate STBD4000400 4TB HDD, EVGA 500w Bronze Plus 80+ PSU - Bodhi Linux 3.2.1 64




A big thank you to everyone who contributes to Bodhi Linux


#2 The waiter

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Posted 06 January 2017 - 05:36 PM

Good question. Why not to read some answers:

 

http://forums.bodhil...-good-at-linux/

 

PS: All the best in New Year for you as well :)



#3 Oblio

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Posted 06 January 2017 - 05:41 PM

Good question. Why not to read some answers:

 

http://forums.bodhil...-good-at-linux/

Thank you - I missed that in my searches!  I'll check it out!


Xeon E3-1220 v3 3.1GHz Quad, ASRock Rack E3C224, 2x 8GB Kingston KVR16E11/8I DDR3-1600 ECC CL11 Intel Chips (Dual Channel), EVGA GeForce GTX 570, Samsung SM863 120GB OS SSD, 2x WD RED 3TB HDDs (Raid 0), Focusrite Scarlett 2i4, Antec Earthwatts EA-750 80 Plus Platinum 750w PSU - Bodhi 4.1.0 64

AMD Phenom II X4 940 3.0GHz Quad, Gigabyte GA-MA78GPM-DS2H, 2x 2GB Kingston KHX8500D2K2 DDR2-1066 (Dual Channel), EVGA GeForce GTX 570, Intel 30GB OS SDD, Seagate ST31000340AS 1TB HDD, Seagate STBD4000400 4TB HDD, EVGA 500w Bronze Plus 80+ PSU - Bodhi Linux 3.2.1 64


#4 Oblio

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Posted 08 January 2017 - 04:59 AM

Anyone use the Linux Bible

 

I have come across it at various points in my life...most recently saw it at a Barnes and Noble the other day and considered getting it...I generally do not like self help books with the name "Bible" or "Dummy" in their titles. 

 

Is it a handy reference?


Xeon E3-1220 v3 3.1GHz Quad, ASRock Rack E3C224, 2x 8GB Kingston KVR16E11/8I DDR3-1600 ECC CL11 Intel Chips (Dual Channel), EVGA GeForce GTX 570, Samsung SM863 120GB OS SSD, 2x WD RED 3TB HDDs (Raid 0), Focusrite Scarlett 2i4, Antec Earthwatts EA-750 80 Plus Platinum 750w PSU - Bodhi 4.1.0 64

AMD Phenom II X4 940 3.0GHz Quad, Gigabyte GA-MA78GPM-DS2H, 2x 2GB Kingston KHX8500D2K2 DDR2-1066 (Dual Channel), EVGA GeForce GTX 570, Intel 30GB OS SDD, Seagate ST31000340AS 1TB HDD, Seagate STBD4000400 4TB HDD, EVGA 500w Bronze Plus 80+ PSU - Bodhi Linux 3.2.1 64


#5 Jayan Tashi

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Posted 07 May 2017 - 04:38 AM

Came across the Linux Foundation introduction course at edx as well and kinda enjoyed it. Usually cheapskate folks like me tend to just complete the courses and screenshot the audit trails instead of paying over a certificate. You may choose otherwise. Have fun! :P


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#6 SmartDuck

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 03:24 PM

Thanx for the introduction course I will take that later.... first I have to finish Nathan House - cyber security courses on udemy, these are great to learn to secure your linux distro and network.


Running...

Bodhi 4.2.0 64bit on a Lenovo 110s

Bodhi 4.1.0 Legacy on a Dell Latitude D505
Damn Small 4.4.10 on an old Compaq Armada 1590DT (48MB memory and 3GB harddisk and still usable for administration tasks)
A couple of Raspberry Pi 's,

Arduino' s

and MSX 1 and 2 computers


#7 birdmun

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 05:58 PM

Speaking of securing linux. There are a couple of videos of talks given by a guy related to SELinux talking about how relatively easy setting up the policies are. He does make it sound more like High School Physics instead of Rocket Science. :)



#8 SmartDuck

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 07:54 PM

SELinux based on a developed by the NSA. Gives me a bad taste in my mouth.

Bodhi is based on Ubuntu and has AppArmor. Never used it.

Bodhi is fine when you're carefull using sudo, add a firewall with gufw/iptables and harddisk encryption.


Running...

Bodhi 4.2.0 64bit on a Lenovo 110s

Bodhi 4.1.0 Legacy on a Dell Latitude D505
Damn Small 4.4.10 on an old Compaq Armada 1590DT (48MB memory and 3GB harddisk and still usable for administration tasks)
A couple of Raspberry Pi 's,

Arduino' s

and MSX 1 and 2 computers


#9 Vaidas

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 09:41 PM

Install virtualbox, install ArchLinux or Manjaro Net, begin building and adding packages, configuring them how you want.

Arch linux wik is VERY well documented and forums will almost always have the post with the issues you are having.

That is how I got my interested in Linux.

Yet due to work have to use WinDOHs for now.



#10 SmartDuck

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 09:53 PM

Install virtualbox, install ArchLinux or Manjaro Net, begin building and adding packages, configuring them how you want.

 

Exactly :)

 

Arch is one of the best documented distros. Has a learning curve, teaches you how to configure and setup your system on the command line.

 

Slackware is great too to learn how linux works and how to configure things.

 

Use VirtualBox and fiddle around with distros...


Running...

Bodhi 4.2.0 64bit on a Lenovo 110s

Bodhi 4.1.0 Legacy on a Dell Latitude D505
Damn Small 4.4.10 on an old Compaq Armada 1590DT (48MB memory and 3GB harddisk and still usable for administration tasks)
A couple of Raspberry Pi 's,

Arduino' s

and MSX 1 and 2 computers


#11 DOOMguy

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 03:18 AM

The book I bought had a coverdisc. This was no foundation or bible but it had CDE as the desktop window manager, yessirreebob, with a C. That book got dogeared and my distro always opened up with four urxvt terminals. I was trying to theme those terminals. So it was command line even while I had a GUI desktop. There were things I had to find out e.g. how to select the subtitle font in mplayer, or start at the halfway point in a movie, or make the movie reach all the way to the second screen. How to make vlc do the same thing. How to make a bash menu work, how to add a custom program or a special font in autostart. When I was handy with some commands, RedHat was in a bargain bin so I bought it and installed 4-dot-oh. I bought a Linux FORMAT magazine with a different distro on it that I didn't have to download over a modem. It was Mandrake; also RPM-based. I joined IRC at the time. Trying to assist people new to linux accelerated my learning, but having the books meant my learning was organized, like my approach to coding, when I was in the cubicle farms. I looked at the questions being asked on IRC channels, not just forums. I saw the answers when the experts helped each other over difficult problems. tldp.org was a frequent stop. I never stopped reading.


Unsolicited advice for learning linux, that won't cost you anything


#12 SmartDuck

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 01:19 PM

I remember starting with Slackware 2.1 bought in a computer shop. Installed it on a 486DX4-100 system. Spending a afternoon to setting up a crt monitor with xf86config. After Slackware I tried Caldera, SuSE and Redhat. Joined the Vector Linux team for a while, adding documentation, burning and shipping cdroms and creating packages.


Running...

Bodhi 4.2.0 64bit on a Lenovo 110s

Bodhi 4.1.0 Legacy on a Dell Latitude D505
Damn Small 4.4.10 on an old Compaq Armada 1590DT (48MB memory and 3GB harddisk and still usable for administration tasks)
A couple of Raspberry Pi 's,

Arduino' s

and MSX 1 and 2 computers






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