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Do we need a "normal" 32bit release?


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#21 Jeff

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Posted 31 January 2017 - 01:26 AM

I have changed the download links on our front page to now be 64 bit / 64 bit AppPack / Legacy, as well as changing our wiki page to recommend 64bit for systems that support it. Interested to see if this changes download numbers at all over the next few months.





A big thank you to everyone who contributes to Bodhi Linux


#22 cooler

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Posted 31 January 2017 - 09:53 PM

My thoughts on the matter: I think you should keep the 32 bit Jeff... lately most distros are considering dropping support for 32 bit.. don't follow "the herd".

Also as pointed out by others 64 bit consumes more memory for same results so is less efficient. As I've seen Bodhi strives for efficiency and speed I think the the 32-bit would suit the formula well.

Given the choice I would choose 32 bit over 64; there are many up to 2 Gb PCs and laptops that have modern components. I don't think it would be good to limit them to an old kernel.

I'm writing this post from an 64 bit Linux version; I've only installed the 64 bit version because Darktable keeps pestering me about 32 bit possible problems on each run.

If possible I think you should merge the 32 bit and legacy onto the same ISO with 2 kernels; upon install depending on CPU possibilities and memory available the best suited kernel should be installed.

Thank you for your wonderful work. I've really enjoyed my time with Bodhi 2.1-2.4.



#23 Oblio

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Posted 04 February 2017 - 03:31 AM

Eventually will our "upstream" make the decision for us?


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#24 Jeff

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Posted 04 February 2017 - 05:05 AM

Eventually will our "upstream" make the decision for us?

I would not be surprised. If that happens - we will simply have to follow. Nowhere near the man power to compile everything ourselves. 18.04 is still a ways off though - which is the next time an Ubuntu change really effects us. Maybe if they drop 32bit at that time we finally move to debian? At any rate - cross that bridge when we get there.



#25 gogolink

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Posted 05 February 2017 - 02:21 AM

I'm running the 32bit version on my Chromebook (Acer C720) -- and have indeed been under the impression that the 64 bit version wouldn't be suitable for the job, and that the non-PAE version with the older kernel wouldn't have all the drivers I need -- in other words, that the normal 32 bit version is really my only reasonable option.  Am I wrong?

 

BTW, the C720 is running quite beautifully on Bodhi.



#26 Jeff

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Posted 05 February 2017 - 05:45 AM

I ran the 64bit version on my Chromebook for awhile without issue. Chrome OS is also 64bit I'm fairly certain. 



#27 gogolink

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Posted 06 February 2017 - 01:55 AM

Oh -- that's good to know!  I'll try the 64bit version on my next fresh reinstall.

Thanks!



#28 Timmi

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 11:20 PM

Is there a reason to keep spending time and bandwidth on a normal 32bit release? 
Thoughts?

 

I presume that you can track the bandwidth and number of downloads. So it should be self explanatory whether it is needed.  

I am glad that you are keeping the non-PAE. 

 

Arch has just discontinued it's 32bit support... perhaps you will get some rollover from the Arch and Arch-derivatives user base, who will be on the lookout for an awesome distro for their old computers.  Manjaro, for example, competes for the same market segment. 

And if other distros are to follow, you might like to adopt a wait-and-see approach, before you make a final decision on that. 

The reason being, some might look for a 32bit distro for their kid's netbook or old laptop, see how nice it is, and decide to adopt the same for their own more powerful computer. 



#29 Timmi

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Posted 14 May 2017 - 04:13 PM

Yes, as I mentioned the Legacy disc will remain as long as Ubuntu compiles 32bit packages.

I agree that 64bit allows to to take advantage of your computer's SMP multi-processing capabilities. It takes more space, more memory, more resources, but in the end, the user has the assurance that programs heavier on resources will have those to call upon. 

 

It's predecessor, was multi-threading. Which the 32bit should have awareness for.

I don't know if there are multi-core 32bit processors - perhaps some Athlons? And I suspect that the regular 32bit may be aware of that? 

And there is also the matter of the older kernel's vulnerability that is still present in the legacy non-pae version. 

 

If given a choice, for all those reasons, I would give preference to the regular 32bit for old hardware and netbooks. I would even give it a try on non-pae netbooks that are limited to a maximun of 2GB of RAM, to see if that can be used instead on those. 

 

There is definitely something alluring about the prospect of being able to run the same Linux on both a weaker machine, as well as on recent hardware. 

The learning curve, about configuring, maintaining, improving, and maintenance, are less work when you have the same flavor of Linux on more of your computers. 

 

So, depending on how much trouble and work it is on the backend, it would really be nice if the 32bit continued to be available... until the day that Ubuntu bloat makes it prohibitively large for that older hardware. 

 

To reduce ISOs maintenance, would it be easier to bundle both versions into the same ISO, and it automatically detects and picks the correct one? 



#30 Jayan Tashi

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Posted 29 May 2017 - 06:58 AM

I would not be surprised. If that happens - we will simply have to follow. Nowhere near the man power to compile everything ourselves. 18.04 is still a ways off though - which is the next time an Ubuntu change really effects us. Maybe if they drop 32bit at that time we finally move to debian? At any rate - cross that bridge when we get there.

In Bodhi there is a Sanskrit term known as "anatman" or in Pali "anatta" which loosely means either there is no fixed entity known as a "we" or that "we" are simply not in charge. At this point of typing I no longer need the 32 bit version of Bodhi Linux, but in the past on virtual guest machines hosted on 64 bit hosts I chose the 32 bit option when installing Bodhi because I did not want to assign 4 Gb of RAM when working on Bodhi Linux when 512 Mb is sufficient at times. Most of the refurbished machines that I installed Bodhi Linux as a primary operating system were already 64 bit systems, i.e. 32 bit systems are hard to come by.

 

Physical machines are unlike software applications. Abandonware can be useful for nostalgic purposes 10, 20 or 30 years down the road as long as the binaries are preserved, but physical machines do become irreparable with age. I say, go along with the flow.  :)


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