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Bodhi ranking


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#1 michmanbiker

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Posted 20 August 2017 - 05:10 PM

I have been using Bodhi for the last month or so. I use it on a modest 2G laptop and it works really well. It does have some quirks but nothing major.

 

So why does it not rank higher on Distrowatch and why is Enlightement use so limited? (I mean it has all the eyecandy and so many features compared to other bloated environments) 

 

Michel





A big thank you to everyone who contributes to Bodhi Linux


#2 The waiter

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Posted 20 August 2017 - 05:56 PM

Just my humble opinion but I think enlightenment was long time considered as desktop manager still unfinished and under heavy development. Also when I read some articles, some authors did not like it. It is a matter of taste. As you can see the environment is rich in features but misses gui for printers, user administrative and more which are common in other popular desktops. Moreover, the first experience could be confusing. I can remember how I struggled in 2011 when I switched from Win to Linux. E was not very user friendly in contrary to lxde or fxce. It needs more attention and time to get use to it. Linux hoppers are too lazy to get over first difficulties and declare how shity the E is. The last thing can be the spartan bijou of Bodhi Linux. It is too bare for people which are used to distros out of the box...

#3 michmanbiker

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Posted 20 August 2017 - 10:46 PM

Just my humble opinion but I think enlightenment was long time considered as desktop manager still unfinished and under heavy development. Also when I read some articles, some authors did not like it. It is a matter of taste. As you can see the environment is rich in features but misses gui for printers, user administrative and more which are common in other popular desktops. Moreover, the first experience could be confusing. I can remember how I struggled in 2011 when I switched from Win to Linux. E was not very user friendly in contrary to lxde or fxce. It needs more attention and time to get use to it. Linux hoppers are too lazy to get over first difficulties and declare how shity the E is. The last thing can be the spartan bijou of Bodhi Linux. It is too bare for people which are used to distros out of the box...

Might be an opportunity for Bodhi, if resources allow, to fill these gaps. I find Enlightenment has too little in some are and way too much in others :-) 



#4 Jeff

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Posted 21 August 2017 - 02:33 AM

As a point of reference distro watch ratings are essentially meaningless. They just measure how many clicks each distro gets on distrowatch's own website. I've even known smaller projects to try and manipulate the numbers on there by asking their users to click on their project once a day.

 

There are lots of reasons you could speculate as to why one desktop is popular and another isn't - but at the end of the day it doesn't really matter. People tend to just use what works for them and if they find that in something right away they generally just stop looking around. I wasn't content with XFCE, KDE, and others so I ended up at Enlightenment 17 and stuck with it to the point of forking it into what Moksha is today when the E team started changing things too much. I just want my desktop to do what I want it to do - which Moksha does. I could honestly care less if anyone else uses it. I don't work on this for other people - I work on it for myself. 



#5 Mr.J

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 10:44 AM

That is a good topic and I have no really good answer. Meanwhile the world of Linux has grown in a way that someone has a hard time to see what is going on. Perhaps this explains the distro hopper-syndrome. The people think they will miss something sensational if they will not try it. Not to forget that many people in the background work hard to make the public think just this. It is like fashion and clothes - some like blue pants with three pockets, others red ones, stone-washed and with two pockets. It is a matter of taste and taste questions are also irrational. Considering rankings and reviews I have the strong feeling that in many cases a high impact landing of fanboyism happened. 

 

At a first glance new users might think that Bodhi requires some work (every distribution does!) and they are not willing to invest it. Ease of use is very important. That is why Gnome, great in making things simple, is very popular. Others love tons of features and customisability (KDE). I like it that Linux is multifaceted.

 

But it all comes down to just a few aspects, and in my point of view Bodhi is there, offering a great experience:

- What do I really need as a user for my specific hardware?

- Is the distro stable and reliable for a good daily workflow?

- Is the infrastructure good enough (security, software repos, lots of people using it and giving feedbacks)?

- Will the distro be maintained professionally for a long time and is it worth to learn its use?

- Ease of use?


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#6 michmanbiker

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 03:03 AM

I agree. Linux is vast, maybe too vast. I find I come back to the spirit of Linux when I decide to revive an old computer, as I am doing now.

 

This is why I got into Linux in the first place, then when it became my OS of choice I used it on modern hardware with KDE / Debian packages, but I felt Linux had lost some of it's "soul" by becoming evermore so bloated and complacent.

 

Having decided to revive this old notebook, I got back to the light Linux distro, back to roots and that is how I got across Bodhi.

 

I think it embodies the spirit of Linux with a new twist. Nimble, fast, light and very graphical. I just wish two things:

 

- That certain services where a bit more straightforward like connecting to other computers, adding users, etc...

- That more key applications be available in the repositories. For example I had to install Unetbootin through a PPA as the existing version did not work with bodhi.

 

I hope Bodhi keeps on focusing on speed and reliability. It is graphical enough as is.

 

My two cents.



#7 RockinBodi

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 11:37 AM

Well, I will say Bodhi's ranking isn't terrible.  I found it as I was clicking through popular distros on distrowatch and liked what I read to give it a whirl.  It really will come down to what the end user wants and how much work they want to put into making linux work.  I'm still very green with linux, and thus I started easy with something that came with all the basics installed and behaved like Windows so I wouldn't get "OS shock" and just give up.  Only once I felt more comfortable playing with the OS more, did I go for a different setup with Bodhi because it definitely plays different than stock Ubuntu.  People that want Windows replacements will probably stick with Ubuntu or Mint because those two typically are the easiest to learn right out of the game coming from Windows and are very stable.  Again, what drew me to Bodhi was the fact you could install what you wanted with no bloatware (and I was comfortable enough to install the things I wanted myself), a UI that took some getting used to but was not impossible to use, and that it ran very fast on my slowish computer compared to full Mint Cinnamon.  Plus I think the name is cool. :D



#8 cooler

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Posted 03 September 2017 - 03:09 PM

 

So why does it not rank higher on Distrowatch and why is Enlightement use so limited? (I mean it has all the eyecandy and so many features compared to other bloated environments) 

 

 

It doesn't rank higher as it has rare releases and therefore it's not in the "spotlight" of distrowatch visitors. It used to be much higher in the distrowatch ranking (between 20th and 30th place most of the time). When Jeff stopped maintaining Bodhi it even got delisted from distrowatch for a while; I'm glad he came back and kept it alive.

Actually I don't think the ranking is quite meaningless, but I would too not regard it as the only metric. New users of Linux usually check out the top distributions, so a high ranking gets you new users, but this might not necessarily be a good thing.

I got to know about Bodhi from an Ubuntu forum post after failing to install the PAE ISO on a Thinkpad X22 laptop: Bodhi was advertised as having a non-PAE iso. I liked Bodhi very much and used it most of the time since.

However I find trying other distros usefull. It's good to exercise our freedom as opposed to the Microsoft Evil Empire.



#9 Jeff

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Posted 03 September 2017 - 04:44 PM

The distrowatch ranking is literally just number of people clicking on Bodhi on the Distrowatch site. It is entirely meaningless. 



#10 Flymo

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 11:36 PM

Around Bodhi 1.1 launch (iirc) Bodhi did briefly hit the top of Distrowatch!  I have the screenshot somewhere, but where?

 

Yes, it is a click-thing. 

And an established stable Bodhi/Moksha is prob'ly not as exciting or clickworthy as shiny new Bodhi 1 was back in the day.

 

Keep doing what you like to do, Jeff.   We love it!



#11 Jeff

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 01:56 AM

Around Bodhi 1.1 launch (iirc) Bodhi did briefly hit the top of Distrowatch!  I have the screenshot somewhere, but where?

 

Yes, it is a click-thing. 

And an established stable Bodhi/Moksha is prob'ly not as exciting or clickworthy as shiny new Bodhi 1 was back in the day.

 

Keep doing what you like to do, Jeff.   We love it!

Thanks for the support as always Flymo :)



#12 Flymo

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 07:11 PM

Bless you Jeff!  May you and yours prosper mightily.  

 

Just had a look at those DistroWatch rankings which do seem to be even more anomalous today than they were the last time I looked.

 

We are indeed at #40 in the list, but there are a goodly  number of worthy distributions even  further down - like Kubuntu at #49,  the ever-useful Knoppix at #56,  the perennially artistic Ubuntu Studio at #65, the backup-friendly Clonezilla at #70,  Valve's  SteamOS at #82,  FreeNAS at #86,  and bringing up the rear is Raspbian (with its many milliards of users)  at #100!

 

Raspbian teetering at the bottom of the top 100?  That says everything.

 

As you say Jeff, no meaning worth mentioning.  I'd speculate that all those zillions of known  RasPi  users just don't visit DistroWatch much since their own raspbian.org and raspberrypi.org do such a good job . . .

 

Aha . . . <lightbulb>

 

Maybe that  is why Bodhi is not getting that many clicks?  

The immaculate bodhilinux.com draws surfers away from DW?   ;)

 

Seriously impressive web presence.   So professional.



#13 Jayan Tashi

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Posted 22 September 2017 - 04:03 PM

Wayland imho is a bottleneck where Enlightenment inspired Linux distributions are concerned, which is why imho it has not been a bad idea that Jeff got started with Moksha sometime back.

 

My take on ranking matters.. eight worldly winds: with praise comes blame, with success comes failure, with pleasure comes pain, with victory comes defeat. Take ladders with a pinch of salt perhaps, and enjoy the good natured linux community here. :wub:


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