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Python 3.5.what?


Best Answer Oblio, 10 February 2018 - 04:33 AM

Distrowatch says "Snapshot" is using 3.6.4 and 17.10 is on 2.7.14.  Sometimes with Long Time Support is a bit behind current, to ensure stability, etc...but agreed, it would seem that fixes would add to the "S"...

 

https://distrowatch....ribution=ubuntu

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#1 Mojosam

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Posted 09 February 2018 - 02:59 AM

I see that Bodhi 4 has Python 3.5.2 installed.  I know we're downstream of Ubuntu LTS, and that's using the Python 3.5 branch instead of 3.6, so that part makes sense.  I was unable to find out which version of Python 3.5 they're using.  The most recent python.org release is 3.5.5.

 

I guess I'm not entirely clear on the LTS philosophy (and how that impacts Bodhi).  Wouldn't Ubuntu keep up to date with all of the 3.5.x updates?  I thought those are mostly fixes.  Isn't that what the "S" in "LTS" stands for?





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#2 Oblio

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Posted 10 February 2018 - 04:33 AM   Best Answer

Distrowatch says "Snapshot" is using 3.6.4 and 17.10 is on 2.7.14.  Sometimes with Long Time Support is a bit behind current, to ensure stability, etc...but agreed, it would seem that fixes would add to the "S"...

 

https://distrowatch....ribution=ubuntu


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#3 Mojosam

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Posted 10 February 2018 - 06:12 AM

OK.  I'll wait and see.  It probably has no bearing on my general Python use.



#4 ylee

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Posted 10 February 2018 - 04:22 PM

I see that Bodhi 4 has Python 3.5.2 installed.  I know we're downstream of Ubuntu LTS, and that's using the Python 3.5 branch instead of 3.6, so that part makes sense.  I was unable to find out which version of Python 3.5 they're using.  The most recent python.org release is 3.5.5.
 
I guess I'm not entirely clear on the LTS philosophy (and how that impacts Bodhi).  Wouldn't Ubuntu keep up to date with all of the 3.5.x updates?  I thought those are mostly fixes.  Isn't that what the "S" in "LTS" stands for?

 
Ok let's clear up a few things:

  • "I guess I'm not entirely clear on the LTS philosophy." LTS means update packages only to correct software bugs and security vulnerabilities. I doubt this means updates to python versions.
     
  • "Wouldn't Ubuntu keep up to date with all of the 3.5.x updates ?" Ubuntu does keep up to date with python versions in latter releases.
     
  • I was unable to find out which version of Python 3.5 they're using." You say yourself they are using Python 3.5.2in Bodhi (xenial 16.04LTS).
     
  • The most recent python.org release is 3.5.5." Nope, the latest release ignoring development releases is Python 3.6.4.

OK.  I'll wait and see.  It probably has no bearing on my general Python use.


Only you would know if you need features from a latter version of python 3.x or need to ensure your software functions correctly in python3.6. You can check the release notes to be sure, for example, What’s New In Python 3.6. Some cool stuff has been added :)
 
If perchance you do need latter versions of python then you have several options. The most obvious is download and compile it yourself. This can be messy and runs the risk of replacing the python version used by Bodhi with a latter version and breaking Bodhi (Ubuntu) packages using python. It can be done however but it is not recommended. Linux Gurus however can do what they wish... Skill Level MASTER
 
A safer method is to build and install multiple versions of Python by using pyenv. These days that is probably the recommended way of doing so. However, it doesn't use apt, and does involve compiling it yourself. It is automated tho and if the you have the right headers and packages installed as easy as pyenv install 3.6.4. Everything runs a normal user, so you don't have to worry about borking the Python version used by Bodhi. It should be noted setting this up may be kinda tricky. A knowledgeable python developer should use this tool however in combination with virtualenv. Note knowledgeable means you are not on forums asking for help on setting all this up... SkIll Level HIGH
 
OK for mere mortals then the easiest to do is snatch a few deb files already created and install by more conventional means. This means finding a PPA with newer python packages. It should be noted We advise against using PPAs. Normally we advise to simply ask for new packages to be put in our repos. I will leave this to you if you decide to use a PPA then proceed with caution and be sure you are knowledgeable enough to deal with any potential problems this can create yourself. For the record I do use PPAs and seldom run into issues and when I have had problems it was a trivial matter for me  to fix them. These issues may not be trivial for less knowledgeable users. You have been warned. If you ask for us to add  python 3.6 packages to the repo then it is going to be up to Jeff to decide whether he wishes to do so or not. I elect not to do so myself, no real advantage for most users and some potential for confusion and or issues caused by doing so.

 

Two PPS:

 

 

In either case after installing python3.6 from one of these PPAs the command python3 launches the system python (Bodhi default python 3.5.2) while the command python3.6 launches the respective python 3.6 version. 

 

Note to use a PPA you need:

sudo apt-get install software-properties-common python-software-properties

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#5 Mojosam

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Posted 11 February 2018 - 01:36 AM

LTS means update packages only to correct software bugs and security vulnerabilities. I doubt this means updates to python versions.

 

That is why I was asking about LTS. I made some assumptions based on that phrase.

 

Doesn't Ubuntu (and therefore Bodhi) use Python itself somewhere?  I assumed they would want to keep it patched. I thought the second-decimal place releases are just fixes.

 

 



#6 ylee

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Posted 11 February 2018 - 06:39 PM

That is why I was asking about LTS. I made some assumptions based on that phrase.

 

Doesn't Ubuntu (and therefore Bodhi) use Python itself somewhere?  I assumed they would want to keep it patched. I thought the second-decimal place releases are just fixes.

 

Stability is the key here, some patches are backported. But LTS packages are centered on a high degree of KNOWN stability. To see what patches have been backported examine the changelog file in the python and python library deb files.

 

I suppose what constitutes stable and what patches are backported all falls on the Ubuntu and the Ubuntu packagers. I am not privy to that information nor can I find much online about it, one could I suppose ask the ppl that package python for ubuntu. But it is hardly worth my or their time. It is what it is ;)

 

If you prefer more up to date packages install them yourself or use latter versions of Ubuntu or even another distro (Debian unstable for example). Up tp date does not always mean better as changes in code bug fixes and so on can introduce more bugs. Debian unstable is termed unstable for a reason. For whatever reason Jeff choose to build Bodhi upon Ubuntu LTS releases and I have never had any reason to question his decision. For me Bodhi is a base which I customize for my own purposes, and that sometimes includes updating packages locally if I see a need. And if I really see a need I might update packages in our repo. 


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