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Zetetes

”[SOLVED]” Bodhi on Toshiba Portege 3110CT

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This is a tough one (for me). I have a Toshiba Portege 3110CT from the 1990s. I want to "revive" it with Bodhi. It has a PCMCIA CD/ROM drive which it cannot boot from. No USB. It had a floppy drive from which it could boot, but this appears to have gone bad while in storage over the past 15 years. It has Win XP on its 6GB HDD. I want to pull the 6GB drive, toss Windows, and load in a new 40GB hdd, set up to be bootable, with a live Bodhi source on it which is ready to run its install when it boots up. Trouble is, I don't know how to set up the clean drive this way. I have another laptop running Mint. I can connect the new empty hard drive to it via USB, and do what needs to be done to the new drive using that platform. I know what's supposed to happen, but not how to set this up. Can I trouble some of you experts to help me pull this off? Many Thanks!!

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You look from the wrong side: You dont need to install ON this device. In fact you can freely move you drives after install, linux is not bound to the device it was installed to.

 

I suggest loading bodhi on the laptop and then install the live media to the USB mounted drive, then just place it back. I did that a already on a similar device because the live medium needs at least 196MB to install. The installed system works fine with 64MB. My pc had 128...

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You look from the wrong side: You dont need to install ON this device. In fact you can freely move you drives after install, linux is not bound to the device it was installed to.

 

I suggest loading bodhi on the laptop and then install the live media to the USB mounted drive, then just place it back. I did that a already on a similar device because the live medium needs at least 196MB to install. The installed system works fine with 64MB. My pc had 128...

 

I appreciate that you troubled to reply.

 

There are no USB connectors on the Toshiba Portege 3110CT. The CD/ROM is connected via a PCMCIA card and cannot be booted from. The floppy drive is broken. There are no options to install from CD, or USB, or floppies. The HDD is clean, empty, new. This new empty hard drive needs to be prepared before it is installed so that it will boot and run a linux install. I am not able to determine from your reply how this is to be done. Sorry.

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*sigh*

 

Lets call your old laptop A and your newer one B.

Take the drive out of A and connect it to B over usb.

Boot B with the live disk.

Run the installer and as target device you select the drive on the usb port, sdb probably.

Place the drive back into A.

Thats it.

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Hello Zetetes,

 

I have another laptop running Mint. I can connect the new empty hard drive to it via USB, and do what needs to be done to the new drive using that platform.

 

Elw3 is telling you to make use of your ability to do this.

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For the inexperienced ones:

 

Boot into the live-cd/usb and select the live session (default)

Once you are up double click on the installer icon.

In the installation options select "something else"

You will see a screen showing all disks and partitions.

Make sure to select the empty usb-drive. ( I presume it has one parttion pre-formatted, so select that)

Next click on a button that says "change"

Verify that you really have selected the usb-drive and select "new partition table"

Now you have the whole drive as unallocated space.

Click the button +

Now create a new primary partition as big as you want, but leave 1 GB unallocated.

Make this new partition as ext4 filesystem with mountpoint " / "

Next select the remaining space and click + again

Create a new extended partition.

Select the extended partition and click + again

Format all the space in there as linux swap

 

Now look close to the line that enables you to select where to install the bootloader.

Make sure you select the drive you just formatted, without adding a number, so sdx and not sdx1

 

Now click on install, fill in all the needed info and wait till it says "finished".

Don't reboot, but select continue testing.

Find the icon for your usb-drive and unmount/eject the drive.

Shutdown the live session as usual.

Now you can place the drive in your old laptop.

 

If all went well it should boot in bodhi.

 

Enjoy,

Charles.

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For the inexperienced ones:

 

[...]

 

If all went well it should boot in bodhi.

 

Enjoy,

Charles.

 

Thank you Charles! I had thought that my inexperience would have been obvious, but you seem to be the only one who noticed it. I appreciate the patient detailed reply.

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Zetetes,

 

Give yourself some credit. You knew what you needed to do, you just needed to read a little more carefully and ask the right questions. :P;) Everyone's a learner, as there is always something to learn.

 

Let us know how it goes, and mark the thread as solved if it works out. :) Hope you enjoy Bodhi!

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*sigh*

 

Lets call your old laptop A and your newer one B.

Take the drive out of A and connect it to B over usb.

Boot B with the live disk.

Run the installer and as target device you select the drive on the usb port, sdb probably.

Place the drive back into A.

Thats it.

 

I get it. Thank you. Sorry to have troubled you.

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Zetetes,

 

Give yourself some credit. You knew what you needed to do, you just needed to read a little more carefully and ask the right questions. :P;) Everyone's a learner, as there is always something to learn.

 

Let us know how it goes, and mark the thread as solved if it works out. :) Hope you enjoy Bodhi!

 

I've got Bodhi installed on my Eee PCs and like it. But I am not linux savvy. I've only ever done easy installs using bootable USBs, or CDs. The necessity of removing the hard drive from the Toshiba seemed to me to require command line knowledge and the ability to make the hard drive bootable. These are things I've never had to do before, except with Windows in the long-ago.

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Zetetes,

 

I'm not saying you knew exactly what to do, but you do have some understanding there. Everyone's got their gaps in what they know (maybe some bigger than others), it's just a matter of the back and forth, questioning and answering, to help reach a solution (hopefully).

 

In this case, it turned out to be easier than you thought it would be. No command line stuff, all GUI.

 

Anyway, glad all seems to be going good with Bodhi. :D Have fun!

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Glad it worked out, you could have encountered issues regarding the disk-naming (sdb or sda) in grub in the Toshiba, in which case you would have need to use the CLI indeed.

 

Well, we all have been beginners, though some seem to have forgotten that. Never feel ashamed to mention the fact that something is very new to you. I'm sure you can beat us all in some other discipline.

 

Enjoy,

Charles.

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I followed the directions and have bodhi installed on the old Toshiba. It seemed fine at first. Then I found that Midori crashes every time I attempt to acces the internet. Every time. System updates run fine through this connection.

 

And is there a program on Bodhi that shows a graphic of hard disk usage?

 

It turned out to be so easy to install that I wouldn't hesitate to start all over again if necessary.

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I followed the directions and have bodhi installed on the old Toshiba. It seemed fine at first. Then I found that Midori crashes every time I attempt to acces the internet. Every time. System updates run fine through this connection.

 

And is there a program on Bodhi that shows a graphic of hard disk usage?

 

It turned out to be so easy to install that I wouldn't hesitate to start all over again if necessary.

 

Midori was chosen because it's lightweight and it was able to install programs from the Bodhi site; I think there are very few people using Bodhi that are also using Midori. I believe you have very little RAM on your old laptop (64 to 128) so you should adjust your expectations accordingly. Bodhi is very frugal... web browsers are not.. so if you use virtual memory your system will be very slow and annoying. You could check memory usage and disk usage using gnome-system monitor that you can install either searching it on synaptic manager or by using in terminology :

 

sudo apt-get install gnome-system-monitor

 

Best of luck!

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Midori sometimes is not reliable, only a few here really use it however.

 

If you want to see how much stuff is used on whatever i recommend reading the bodhi guide first. We have some gadgets for Disk storage/ram usage/cpu usage that just need to be placed.

On that system you may need a huge amount of swap and a little swappiness to compensate the slow drive or else most programms will crash.

If you do not know what that means please start a new topic.

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