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DaveL60

Is Google Chrome a pig?

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I'm largely in the habit of depending on Google Chrome as my primary web brower. On my Windows systems it works great, and also on my Chromebook (as you'd really expect).  So naturally I want to use it with Bodhi as well.  Having done my Bodhi 3.0 installation, I went to Google's site, downloaded the .deb, and ran dpkg to install.  I discovered I had to add one library before the installation would complete.  That done, I loaded up Chrome, signed in to my Google account, loaded Gmail, then a fresh tab with a video (YouTube embedded on another website).  While watching the video I opened couple more tabs and suddenly everything slowed dramatically.  The video came pretty much to a halt.  In addition, my laptop fan cranked up, which it really hadn't done since the 3.0 installation.  I closed Chrome and opened Firefox instead, and it's performance wasn't terribly impressive either.

 

Now I'm wondering if Chrome and whatever background services Google might install with it are sapping my laptop's performance and driving up the CPU temp.  At the moment I'm back to Midori and fan speed is back to more or less normal.

 

Anyone else had a similar experience?  

 

DaveL

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I do not use chrome so I have no answer for it. Have you installed htop? I would install it then bring it up in a terminal and launch your browser and do the things again. Watch the htop and see what is using your cpu and memory. This will give you a indication to see what is going on.

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Chrome and firefox are heavy applications. The modern web is NOT a lightweight application. I regularly have Chrome open with 10-20 tabs and it consistently uses 2+ gigs of RAM to display these.

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I use Chrome pretty regularly on a couple of laptops with 2 gigs of RAM but it can be touchy. I have to watch the number of open tabs and other applications that I have running or it is likely to crash the entire desktop. Like it just did a few minutes ago.

I had too many things open though: Viber desktop client running in Wine, Geany, Terminology, RedNotebook, Focuswriter, and Chrome with one too many tabs (in hindsight) 

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My Chromebook runs Linux and Chromium seems to fly on it. I don't really like all that Google fuzz, so going for Chromium seems to be a good idea. It is a heavy program compared to say Midori, but I have no problem running a tab with video for the music, a tab for browsing and one for gmail. Hell, I can get away with coding while running Chromium and editing an image in Gimp.

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I'm Trying out the  mozilla build of seamonkey. I like it. I've got my memory usage at least 25% lower than google chrome and no lag.

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I'm Trying out the  mozilla build of seamonkey. I like it. I've got my memory usage at least 25% lower than google chrome and no lag.

I have used seamonkey as well... im not a fan of google at all.  I don't user their browser or search engine.  They trap waaaaay to much information in my mind.   Especially on android devices.   Anyways....

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This may have been covered elsewhere in the forums, but if not it might prove useful to others. I had noticed lately that anytime I tried to go to the Chrome web store to look at extensions on my two oldest computers it inevitably crashed. I thought this was just part of using older hardware and using Google’s browser. This evening I did a bit of research and found this on an Ubuntu forum:

 

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2247572

 

I tried it and it worked for me. If you don’t want to click the link, basically it just involves going to your Chrome settings and disabling hardware acceleration as seen in screen shot below under advanced settings.

 

shot-2015-03-17_21-17-57.jpg

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@ mbemboom

 

Why enabling the option "Continue running background apps when Google Chrome is closed" option?? Does that not eat system memory anyway?

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It does not cause me any issues one way or the other. When this laptop is turned on Google Chrome is pretty much never closed anyway.

@ mbemboom

 

Why enabling the option "Continue running background apps when Google Chrome is closed" option?? Does that not eat system memory anyway?

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I'm Trying out the  mozilla build of seamonkey. I like it. I've got my memory usage at least 25% lower than google chrome and no lag.

I do like the fact that there's a Seamonkey version of AdBlock Plus. Guess I'll have to give it a try.

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It does not cause me any issues one way or the other. When this laptop is turned on Google Chrome is pretty much never closed anyway.

Meaning it is using system memory all the time? Or not?

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Meaning it is using system memory all the time? Or not?

I am sorry but I am not certain that I understand what you want to know. I use this particular laptop for web browsing when away from home. I use Google Chrome as my web browser. Anytime the computer is in use, Google Chrome is open. Google Chrome does use system memory. 

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If I'm correct I think he was asking if Chrome's process and/or services are always running in the system memory even when Chrome is closed. Like certain program updaters do in Windows (freaking adobe! :angry:).

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Thanks for the link to that ebook, I hadn't been aware of it.  Downloaded now for future perusal.

 

On the whole my Chrome experience has improved after the initial slowness, but there are still moments.  OTOH, my bigger issue now is a few instances of outright system crash (spontaneous power off) while running Chrome.  Never had that happen with Bodhi 2.4 / e17.

 

DaveL

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basically it just involves going to your Chrome settings and disabling hardware acceleration as seen in screen shot below under advanced settings.

 

 

Going to give that a try, given I've had a couple of system crashes.

 

DaveL

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Try Palemoon, they have a tarball installer linked on their site. www.palemoon.org They are what Firefox used to be. There is some debate on their security level as being ran mostly by one guy, but a whole team does contribute. It's based on the old Firefox code before Hello and Australis, but they've recently moved to Goanna which is a separate, gecko-like engine. They have issues with gmail and certain other sites, but for everyday browsing they are fine. 

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I am using Chromium, but,

 

Yes. I don't know why Chromium needs to reserve so big space just for helping me answering this forum. :P

 

v2CAraY.png

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When looking for an efficient enough browser to use (for daily use on a tiny laptop and quick tasks on much faster desktop) I tested the following browsers speed and a couple other efficiency points: Chrome, Firefox, Seamonkey, (Firefox) Light, Palemoon, Midori and Xombrero. Here are some results (if you click on the link then on the full scale image you'll get animated results):

RHc.gif

 

My test's missing Flashpeak-Slimjet which is an efficient Blink-based browser (impacts the system about the same as Seamonkey).

 

Now that I use a *fast* browser I find Google Chrome laggy and a gaz factory on my quad-core Chromebook. Some needed add-ons seem to eat resources and power however I did not open a single Chrome tab/window (the ChromeOS concept).

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My experience is that Google Chrome and Chromium and FireFox are in fact hogs.  I run htop or conky most of the time and if any of these three browsers are running, they constantly are at the top of the  cpu and memory usage stack.  Even others apps like WPS Office, RStudio, TexStudio barely show up in the top 5 when these browsers are running.  My laptop(s) are pretty well loaded up with memory, so I don't see too much lag, but it is noticeable.  I find myself killing the browser (whichever one) fairly often.  

 

For development and troubleshooting web pages though, they sure are handy!  

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Now that I use a *fast* browser I find Google Chrome laggy and a gaz factory on my quad-core Chromebook. Some needed add-ons seem to eat resources and power however I did not open a single Chrome tab/window (the ChromeOS concept).

 

Based on the graph, I'm guessing the fast browser you picked is Xombrero?  Do you find it lacking in any features?

 

My understanding is that one of the reasons Chrome / Chromium is a bit of a hog is that it sandboxes each tab for security reasons. So in this case a faster browser might also be a less secure browser.  I know nothing about Xombrero, so that's just a generalized observation, not intended as a criticism or objection.  Just looking to learn.

 

Also, is Xombrero an active project? Not much activity showing on its github page.

 

DaveL

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I've been using Firefox for many years (never been a fan of Chrome), but the most recent update broke it's integration with "KeepassX". I prefer KeePassX to "KeePass2.0," because it doesn't require "mono" or any other MS code. Basic "KeepassX" isn't capable of integrating with any browser, but there are some branches (https://github.com/keepassxreboot/keepassx) that interface through "PassIFox." Updating to "Firefox 49" broke this integration (ie username and password no longer automatically loaded on opening a site's login page). I tried several other browsers like "Chrome" (again) and "Seamonkey," that would support KeepassX, and finally settled on "Palemoon." Palemoon is fast. It seems to load pages pretty much as quickly as I can press "enter."

 

In addition to supporting "KeepassX " through "PassIFox," Palemoon also supports the other security add-ons I use either through Palemoon versions like "Encrypted Web" (HTTPS Everywhere) and "Decentraleyes X.X.X-palemoon," or through regular Mozilla add-ons like "uBlock origin" and "Disconnect," It also accepts "Startpage" as an alternate search engine. Once I added "Palemoon Linux 3.0" and "Foobar," transferred my bookmarks as a saved HTML, and futzed around with "preferences" and "about:config" for a while I ended up something that looks and acts very much like the secured "Firefox Australis" I was replacing, with the advantage of being much more responsive. I've been using it for about a month now and I'm very pleased. I'm so pleased I'm thinking of  moving from "Thunderbird" to Palemoon's "FossaMail."

 

I have to admit that Jame's earlier comment , "There is some debate on their security level as being ran mostly by one guy, but a whole team does contribute." was something that gave me pause when I first considered Palemoon. However, I rationalized, "couldn't I say the same about "Bodhi?"

 

If anyone wants to install a reasonably secure version of Palemoon to replace Firefox or Chrome you could probably use this post as an outline. I'd also suggest that you consider subscribing to a secure anonymous VPN. If I move to FossaMail I'll try to write a similar post on the install and customization. I'm also considering moving to Palemoon's sync service. I find the fact that (in addition to username/password credentials) palemoon sync both encrypts synced data before sending and decrypts that synced data only on my machine with a key that remains on my machine is very attractive from a security viewpoint. I'll also let folks know how this works out.

 

I suppose my emphasis on security might make me appear like a member of the "Tin-Foil Helmet Brigade," but since Snowden we do know that they're watching all of us at least generally. None of the add-ons I'm using are difficult to install, nor do they adversely affect my browsing. I can't see any reason that I should make it easy for the various Business and Government busybodies. If everyone made the snoopers job just a bit more difficult, then mass surveillance might become prohibitively difficult and expensive. End of Rant.

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I see no mention in this thread of Opera.  

 

It's been running as well as can be expected on a first-generation netbook (note my signature).  I also have Firefox and Chromium installed, but usually return to Opera, when the SSD indicator light starts to flicker continuously and scrolling locks up, or nearly locks up.

 

I just discovered there's an Opera plugin that makes it compatible with (apparently all?) plugins/addons/whatever? in the Chrome Store.  Someone mentioned security, so I'll add the reason I kept searching for this compatibility feature is that I can now have Mailvelope running on Opera -- just as well as it does on my Chromium and Firefox installations. 

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