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Wolfgang

ArandR

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Bodhi Linux is a great piece of software, but certain annoying things must be improved. Today, many people work with more than one monitor. It is terribly annoying to do that with Bodhi. I have not found out a way to make Bodhi automatically start with the correct monitor configuration. Every time I start I have call the configuration file and apply it again. Should it not be possible that the system recognizes the monitor configuration automatically? Ubuntu does without problems.

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Bodhi Linux is a great piece of software, but certain annoying things must be improved. Today, many people work with more than one monitor. It is terribly annoying to do that with Bodhi. I have not found out a way to make Bodhi automatically start with the correct monitor configuration. Every time I start I have call the configuration file and apply it again. Should it not be possible that the system recognizes the monitor configuration automatically? Ubuntu does without problems.

 

Depending on what video card you use, this can be easily setup.  I personally have run three monitors on Bodhi for years.  In my opinion, Linux is great for this due to it's ability to use absolute positioning (in my opinion it does this much better than windoz) - that is, if one monitor is slightly higher/lower than the other, you can assign it to the system in a way that your mouse will move smoothly from one monitor to the next without coming on the screen higher or lower from the previous monitor.

 

I use Nvidia cards, so I am using their control panel...which is really just editing your xconfig file.  Generally, back up your old config (to be safe - change the filename to "xconfigbackup" or something) and then open the Nvidia control panel as sudo.  This should allow you to save your config.  If not, you may need to chmod the xconfig file while it is being edited.

 

AMD/ATI I would assume is just as easy as Linux generally supports AMD/ATI natively.

 

Provide some more details and we should be able to get you setup.

 

Cheers!

 

[edit]

 

https://askubuntu.com/questions/456470/cant-save-nvidia-settings-for-screens-after-reboot - This should get you started.

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As a follow up to Oblio's response (which is spot-on), having an xorg.conf saved with your multi-head setup virtually guarantees the same result every time, regardless of distro. Want to try the new GNOME on *buntu, with the multimonitor? Let the distro autodetect, and maybe it can set two out of three displays. So then you pull up the backup of xorg.conf from a thumb drive, do some minor edits so that the labels and names match, get the versions in sync, and BAM you get to see GNOME on all three. Then you save that edited version as a separate backup (save as all new xorgconf.buntuGnome or whatever)

 

The log file is the key. If I remember correctly, it's var/log/Xorg.conf.log or something; it will list error and diagnostic messages, and all the resolutions supported by your graphics card. You can issue the complete and proper xrandr command to try newer resolutions too, but remember to save that final version, so you can say good-bye to xRandR because you took the time to set it up the reliable way. It's dependable, and it will absolutely positively get your video working for all three monitors. (There is an entire section on xRandR on the wiki for Thinkpads called ThinkWiki)

 

When I had nvidia, and in its control panel, one of the checkboxes was Restore session on startup. Put a check next to it, so that when you bring up the gui next time, it will be at the proper resolution(s) and correct layout. But when I had ATI, all it needed was the bulletproof xorg.conf---to fire up three displays. I could then try tiling, panning, etc.

 

For troubleshooting one of the monitors would be on IRC. weechat, that is, if not irssi. Even without the desktop, support from experienced guys was always available, one simply had to leave the question hanging there, for one of them to reply back.

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I tried to plug in an external vga monitor to a laptop, but ended up with a screen with no shelves on either the lappy or the external. Everytime, I rebooted it went back to no shelves. So since it was just being used for media I just set up gadgets on the desktop. A nice work around until I have time to get xrandr figured out. (no Nvidia).  It's funny because back in bodhi 2.* Bodhi handled dual monitors almost better than any other Linux Distro.

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I am using an Intel Core 2 duo internal video.

Useful for people moving to Linux would be information about the location of the xorg.conf file and details about the required edits. Given all the advantages of Bodhi I am perfectly willing to invest time; however, there are so many complaints about the multi-monitor issue in Linux floating around that some improvements would really help to make it more useful.

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I haven't been running bodhi for some time now. I am running Arch with the moksha desktop though. I still keep a bodhi system running more or less (darn presentation mode still not behaving). With some digging around I managed to get my laptop that is connected to an external monitor to behave the way I wanted it to. In doing this I simply wrote an addition to the xorg rules that is then loaded each time the system boots. You can add a rule to /usr/share/X11/xorg.conf.d/ or at least that is where it was for my install.

Section "Monitor"
        Identifier      "lvds monitor"
        Option  "Ignore"        "True"
EndSection
Section "Device"
        Identifier      "onboard"
        Option  "Monitor-LVDS"  "lvds monitor"
EndSection
 

The above code was put in a file called 50-disable-lvds.conf When xorg.conf gets automagically generated at each boot, that code gets added and my laptop's broken screen gets shutoff so that only my vga out gets used. Yes I had to do some digging and trial and error, but, it works now.

Edited by birdmun

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I am using an Intel Core 2 duo internal video.

Useful for people moving to Linux would be information about the location of the xorg.conf file and details about the required edits. Given all the advantages of Bodhi I am perfectly willing to invest time; however, there are so many complaints about the multi-monitor issue in Linux floating around that some improvements would really help to make it more useful.

 

A lot of what I experienced when initially searching for my solution was people not understanding how to run items as sudo and file permissions (with me falling into this category at that time)...both of these can be fairly unique when moving from another OS.  I have enjoyed my multi-monitor setup much more so on Linux vs. another OS...however, it took a bit of trial and error and some help from my friends on the Bodhi IRC/Forums  ;) 

 

Regarding formalizing a walk-through for video support...this is just my guess, but I would assume that with so many variations of video cards - integrated and non - that this would not make a good Wiki topic and is likely why it has not been covered.  It is likely similar to why we do not have a detailed WiFi setup page...troubleshooting WiFi adapters, due to the nearly endless combinations or hardware, etc, can be very tricky.

 

That said, we will certainly try our best to help you out!

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