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tmq

Bodhi 2.2 sudo bug in terminal?

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In a fresh install of Bodhi 2.2, lxterminal won't recognize "sudo" - what am I missing?

 

xx@xxxx-desktop:~$ sudo
usage: sudo [-D level] -h | -K | -k | -V
usage: sudo -v [-AknS] [-D level] [-g groupname|#gid] [-p prompt] [-u user
           name|#uid]
usage: sudo -l[l] [-AknS] [-D level] [-g groupname|#gid] [-p prompt] [-U user
           name] [-u user name|#uid] [-g groupname|#gid] [command]
usage: sudo [-AbEHknPS] [-C fd] [-D level] [-g groupname|#gid] [-p prompt] [-u
           user name|#uid] [-g groupname|#gid] [VAR=value] [-i|-s] [<command>]
usage: sudo -e [-AknS] [-C fd] [-D level] [-g groupname|#gid] [-p prompt] [-u
           user name|#uid] file ...
xx@xxxx-desktop:~$ 

-

 

(time on a distro that uses "sudo" evidently)

Edited by tmq

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What exactly are you trying to do here? The sudo command you ran above just returned AOK.

 

~Jeff

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What exactly are you trying to do here? The sudo command you ran above just returned AOK.

 

Good grief - I believe was thinking of slackware derivitives - su (then) pw = xxx

 

But root priviliges in terminal? What executes efm? I tried "su enlightenment_filemanager"...

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To run su

 

run

 

sudo su

 

and give your password. You'll then be in a root prompt.

 

Otherwise, just run whatever command you want with sudo, IE:

 

sudo synaptic

 

for instance, give your password, and it will be run as root.

 

Aloha.

 

PS: sudo means "do as su".

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PS: sudo means "do as su".

 

PS: sudo means "substitute user, do". ;)

 

Otherwise very solid advice.

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I just feel obliged to point out that it's not always a giod idea to run powerful GUI applications like filemanagers as root. That's obviously something you'll have to decide for yourself, but keep in mind; 'to err is human'.

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I just feel obliged to point out that it's not always a giod idea to run powerful GUI applications like filemanagers as root. That's obviously something you'll have to decide for yourself, but keep in mind; 'to err is human'.

 

Of course :) - occasionally I poke around filesystem folders (icons/themes) or even empty the trash manually.

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I would recommend using the traditional tools like cp, mv, rm etc for jobs like that. Most of them (if not all) have the -i and -v flags, and they're there for a reason. ;)

 

Now, you seem to know what you're doing, and as I said it's totally up to you. I just feel that everyone should know about this, and especially if an inexperienced user finds this thread.

 

May the FOSS be with you. :3

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